WestJet Flight Light

Over the last year or so, I have seen more and more brands from different industries actively experimenting with new ways to move beyond selling their products and providing their consumers with “convenience services” that eventually drive repeat usage / purchase of the product.

In this latest example, WestJet wanted to give their business travelers the ability to pursue opportunities, without losing connection with their loved ones at home. So, they created WestJet Flight Light, a nightlight that used live flight data to project a WestJet flight path onto a child’s bedroom ceiling. This simple device made the countdown of the hours and minutes to the parents return even more fun and interactive for the children waiting at home.

The prototype of the Flight Light is going to be in beta-testing throughout this summer. To stay updated visit the Flight Light homepage for more information.

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Burger King Burn that Ad

Over the years we have seen many advertisers trying to hack, mock or leverage their competitors ads. In Brazil, Burger King with the help of ad agency David SP used augmented realtiy to burn their competitors ads via their consumers mobile phones while rewarding the participating consumer with a free Whopper.

Burger King is expecting to give away 500,000 Whoppers through this promotion, so that more and more people use their Burger King Express service which lets customers pre-order food for pickup.

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Ford Smart Lane-Keeping Bed

Ford Europe has unveiled a “Lane-Keeping Bed” that ensures partners always have equal amounts of sleeping space. The idea was inspired by the driver-assist technology that prevents unintentional drifting in new models like the 2019 Ford Ranger.

As demonstrated in the video below, pressure sensors detect when an active dreamer strays to the opposite side of the mattress and triggers an integrated conveyor belt that puts them back where they belong.

Like Ford’s noise-cancelling dog kennel, the Lane-Keeping Bed is only a prototype in the company’s “Interventions” series of innovations that extend beyond the car industry.

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Robomart

Only a tiny fraction of the $1 trillion grocery market has moved online. On-demand delivery is prohibitively expensive for retailers and it is extremely important for consumers to pick their own foods. For decades consumers have had the convenience of their local greengrocer, milkman, and ice-cream vendor coming door to door, yet it never made economic sense to scale – until now, by leveraging driverless technology.

This spring, Robomart, a California-based company is teaming up with grocery chain Stop & Shop for a trial run of their world’s first driverless grocery store service in Boston, Massachusetts. All the users of this service need to do is summon the mobile grocery store using a mobile app. When the store turns up outside their door, they can simply tap in a code on the vehicle to unlock its doors, grab what they like from the selection of everyday items and meal kits, and that’s it.

In summer 2018, Nuro, a tech startup, teamed up with supermarket giant Kroger for an autonomous grocery delivery service to customers in Scottsdale, Arizona. To use the service, customers had to place an order with Kroger via a smartphone app. Back at the depot, the staff loaded up the autonomous pod’s secure lockers with the customer order and sent it on its way. When the “R1” autonomous delivery pod arrived at the scheduled stop, the customer simply tapped in a code to open the locker and access their groceries.

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